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DearCEO site review: Interesting IR/research model

Posted on June 15, 2010 at 6:27 pm

Somewhere in the meaty space between IR, PR, and investment research falls DearCEO.  The site is essentially an investor and corporate management network that allows investors to submit questions about a stock to corporate management and then provides a mechanism for management to respond.

Interesting model.  Anyone using it.

DearCEO made Simple from Made Simple Media on Vimeo.

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  • Top business books to read this summer

    Posted on June 20, 2010 at 9:36 am UTC

    Here is a short compilation of top business books taken from the New York Times best seller list (if you purchase off these links, my Amazon account gets credited a minute sum).  Hopefully, this is useful.  Some, if not all, of these titles should be on your nightstand.

    *************
    The Blind Side (Movie Tie-in Edition) (Movie Tie-in Editions): As always, Lewis is a great story teller in the world of business and sports (think previous hit, Moneyball — a great read) and this tale of rags to fame was supported by a recent movie with the same title.  My kids even enjoyed it.

    Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work: Like this one a lot.  As a fan of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, this book eschews the cubicle life for something more valuable, real — and it’s found by using one’s hands and body.

    The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook: A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal: As a Harvard grad myself, I always find these sordid tales of great minds acting like lunatics while pursuing their fortunes.  Facebook, the company and its founders, are totally complicit.  Mezrich is a great writer (The movie, 21, was a takeoff of his Bringing Down the House)

    Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard: Heath Brothers (of Made to Stick fame) are at it again with a gameplan to help readers face hard changes in life and make them a little bit easier.

    Sign up to get more real-time updates from me and Tradestreaming.

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  • Financial product development a la AlphaClone

    Posted on June 18, 2010 at 8:58 am UTC

    Interesting case study(.pdf) from Venture Capital and Private Equity Club (UCLA chapter) on the launch of piggyback investing platform, AlphaClone.

    Combining an interview with founder and CEO, Maz Jadallah, the paper includes his comments that should provide a resounding recommendation for using blogging as a lead generation tool for premium financial products:

    Jadallah: Hiring a PR firm turned out to be a disaster for us. They simply did not perform well. The important point here is what does a startup do when they have zero/limited budget for marketing. Answer: blog, blog, blog, use word of mouth, run affiliate programs, cold call reporters, try to get content syndicated on third party sites!!

    Source

    AlphaClone, LLC: Launching an Investment Services Business in the
    Midst of a Financial Crisis
    (Undergraduate Journal)

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  • Yahoo Finance getting in on the real-time game

    Posted on June 17, 2010 at 12:11 pm UTC

    Thanks to the ever-vigilant Felix Salmon (he’s a hawk, actually) who tweeted a job opening at Yahoo Finance.

    From the job posting:

    We’re looking for an experienced, versatile, high-motor blog editor specializing in business news targeted at both sophisticated and mass-market audiences. The successful candidate will write and report his or her own stories, as well as hire and manage a small team of professional bloggers to curate and create original content for the largest audience on the Web. This person will set the strategy for and oversee the publication of financial blog content for programming on Yahoo! Finance, the Yahoo! network and consumption on the Web at-large.

    The move in context

    So, like Forbes which recently announced its intentions and strategy to unload its Investopedia property and embark on a more real-time blogging/curating model, Yahoo Finance is moving towards its own real-time financial content aggregation model.  Whether you agree with Fobes’ decision or not (and Paul Carr most certainly doesn’t calling it the “death of a thousand hacks”), Yahoo Finance’s move is different.

    Forbes and Forbes.com have always been about content.  Forbes has always employed professional editors in a mixed outside-inside model for content, blending its own staff reporters with content contributed from asset managers and thought-leaders in their field.  Never known for its ability to break stories, Forbes really was about highlighting interesting opinions from experts in their verticals.

    But Yahoo is different than Forbes

    Yahoo Finance is a different animal.  While Yahoo Finance hasn’t changed much in the past 10 years (much to my chagrin), this move changes its tack.  Remember, Yahoo Finance, as a giant financial portal, has always been about aggregation of both data and information, taking feeds from tens of information and content providers.  By the way, check out ValueCruncher’s CEO’s, Mark Clare, great breakdown of Yahoo Finance, its past, its business and potential to disrupt providers like Bloomberg in the future.

    Yahoo Finance is still the 800-lb gorilla in online finance as evidenced by its majority of traffic in the online finance category (see graph to the right). What’s made Yahoo Finance so strong was an early-mover advantage and a site that just worked quickly and had enough information on it to act as a proxy for a research terminal (Why Google Finance still sucks at its news offering is beyond me).  With a deal it consummated with Seeking Alpha in 2007, Y! Finance dipped its big toe into the wild and woolly financial blogosphere.  Now, with the job posting mentioned above, it appears that Yahoo Finance is changing its strategy.

    How this may play out

    This is a risky strategy.  In essence, the financial portal is pitting itself opposite all its content partners — many of whom pay the portal for the firehose of traffic it throws off.   I’d be less willing to partner with a company that is introducing a product to compete directly with mine.  And this is a common problem with channel marketing for any platform — and Yahoo Finance is certainly a finance platform — in that the platform, given where it sits in the whole matrix of supply-demand, can always just mimic other offerings that are working.  This is the fear of developing any tools that work on Twitter of Facebook – that the social media platform can quickly just put you out of business.

    Such is the life now for Yahoo Finance content partners.  If (and this is a big IF) the Yahoo Finance offering is a combination of serious, professional editorial oversight with smart curation with a good understanding of what’s important to Y! Finance readers (a-la Abnormal Returns) with thought-evoking and decision-supporting articles, Yahoo Finance can evolve itself from a financial resource to a must-see, must-read site for both individual and institutional investors.

    What if it doesn’t work

    If, however, Yahoo Finance doesn’t do this right and takes a half-assed, half-baked approach, the results could be pretty serious: both for the company/site and for content, in general.  As Steve Lubetkin argued with me yesterday in the comments on PRNewser’s article Is Steve Rubel the Future of Forbes, aggregation using free, contributed — outside content — risks turning everything into an “echo chamber” where the biggest voices (those voices appearing everywhere) drown out newer, more creative content by people who take content creation really seriously.  If Yahoo Finance’s own content offering isn’t managed well, it could cause other partners to leave the site, taking their money and their contribution to the estimated few hundred million dollars in annual revenue Yahoo Finance generated.

    What this all  means for aggregation sites?  We’ll have to see how it plays out.   There’s most likely room for multiple aggregators if they end up focusing on slightly different readerships (a retirement investors reads different content than a day trader).

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  • NFL to Wall Street: QB is conservative (likes bonds)

    Posted on June 16, 2010 at 2:47 pm UTC


    Matt Cassel, Kansas City Chief’s QB, has a massive 6 year, $63M contract. He’s looking towards a second career on Wall Street when he hangs up his cleats.

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  • What is Tradestreaming: Crowdsource your Portfolio

    Posted on June 16, 2010 at 2:19 pm UTC

    The wisdom of the crowds has been used to better predict world events, elections, and the outcomes of sporting events. It’s now being used for more accurate forecasting of stock prices. Instead of following experts, crowdsourcing investment ideas seeks to assess what the masses think about a specific stock. The crowd is frequently more accurate in its predictions than top analysts?.

    Enter Social Media

    But with the onslaught of investors publishing their thoughts on stocks and the market on Facebook and Twitter, it’s hard for investors to monitor all the noise. Determining what the crowd thinks about a specific investment is tricky. Therefore, we’ll also explore different ways that investors can effectively plumb the wisdom of the crowds to build a portfolio populated with stocks the crowd thinks are going up.

    What if there was a way to leverage the collective knowledge of all investors out there and use it to make a profit? What if you could build a portfolio that took investment ideas from the throngs of day traders and couch-potato investors, firemen and police officers, lawyers and doctors—a population of millions of investors? Figure out where the herd mentality thinks profits are and damn the experts.

    Tradestreaming is that way.

    <– Previous: Following the Insiders I Next: Screening 2.0 –>

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About Tradestreaming

Tradestreaming is a community of investors learning directly from experts. I’m Zack Miller, investor, entrepreneur, and founder of Tradestreaming.com and I literally wrote the book on how to invest in the age of Facebook and Twitter. Tradestreaming is the resource I’ve created to help me become a better investor.  I believe it will help you … Continue Reading